Archive for: ‘September 2019’

Your home: Tips to staying safe around the home this winter

27/09/2019 Posted by admin

Maintenance: Have a qualified person check your fireplace, combustion heater, flue and chimney at least once a year to ensure they work properly and safely.If you’ve rummaged through the back of the cupboard and pulled out products you used last winter, you need to check they are still safe to use.Product Safety Australia provided the following tips to stay safe this winter:
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Hot water bottlesHot water bottles are manufactured from rubber or PVCand can deteriorate with age. Each year, 200 people in Australia are treated for serious burns from using hot water bottles.

Don’t overfill or use boiling water in your hot water bottle – use hot tap water.Once filled, avoid direct contact with your skin – use a fitted cover or wrap.Never leave on one body part for more than 20 minutes. Warming: Don’t overfill or use boiling water in your hot water bottle – use hot tap water – and avoid direct contact with your skin.

Electric blankets

Electric blanket should be rolled to store and at the start of winter check all the cords, elementsand fabric before use. Damaged or faulty electric blankets can cause an electric shock or fire hazard.

Don’t sleep with your electric blanket on – warm the bed and then turn it off.Never place heavy items on your bed when the electric blanket is on.Seek advice about using an electric blanket if you have diabetes or are pregnant.Wheat/Heat Packs

The organic fillings inside wheat packs can dry out and become more combustible with age.

Do not heat and place the wheat pack on or in bedding. Blankets trap the product’s heat and may cause it to ignite.Allow the wheat pack to cool completely each time before reheating.Smoke alarms

A working smoke alarm reduces your chance of dying in a house fire by half.

Test your smoke alarm is working every month.Replace your alarm battery every year and the alarmevery 10 years.Candles

Always ensure the wick ember of your candleis no longer glowing prior to leaving a room or before going to sleep.

Store matches and lightersout of reach of children, and never leave children alone with any open flame.Keep lit candles away from curtains, beddingand clothing.Heaters

Make sure there are no exposed wires or loose connections on your heater before winter.Only use one appliance per power point and switch off when not in use.

Never use a gas heater or BBQ made for outdoor use insideAlways supervise children and pets when heaters are on.Keep heaters aminimum of onemetre away from clothes, bedding and furniture.More details productsafety.gov419论坛

Your home: Staying cool with desert chic

27/09/2019 Posted by admin

Custom touch: Forbes Artist Jess Dawes from Tassel and Heart creates custom wall hangings which fit perfectly with Desert Chic interiors. From the lofts of New Yorkto the shores of Byron Bay, one trend is standing out as a design powerhouse in 2018.
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Desert Chic is a look that originates from the minimalist homes that grace the deserts of Southern California, or So-Cal as it’s known to locals.

Past influencesThe look honours the colours and crafts of the ancient Indian tribes that originally occupiedthe area.It also takes its influence from Mexican neighbours to the south.

The white walls, muted colours and hardy planting schemes suit ourAustralian lifestyle well.

The look has been adopted by many enthusiastic local Instagrammers as the epitome of style.

To achieve the look, the palette should be considered from inception.

Muted reds, oranges and greens feature heavily, while white is the background colour of choice.

Tribal patterns are featured in artwork, ceramics and used in large scale rugs which pull the whole look together.

The idea is to steer clear of too many knick-knacks and keep plenty of white, visible space.

To re-intepret this look for Australian living, use materials such as linen for window coverings and rattan or cane for furnishings.

Fill vases with Australian plants such as eucalyptus leaves, wattle and banksia.

Take it outsideHardy plants in varying shades of green such as succulents and cacti should be set against white or muted coloured walls.

Fill garden beds with matte rocks to add to the waterwise look.

Keep it simple and allowthe raw beauty of the plants to be the star of the show.

Garden on pointUse succulents and cacti against muted walls to create the sparse, practical look of desert style.

Eclectic accentsTry local craft and second-hand markets for decor in muted 70s colours or handmade items such as wall hangings and pot stands.

Online marketplaces are a great place to find pre-loved furniture in the refined, clean retro style that suits this look.

Easy to clean and easy to maintain, desert chic style not only looks good in Australian homes but also suits our relaxed, easy lifestyle.

Bring it home: Adding cane pieces such as these from Hello Trader on the Sunshine Coast in Queensland gives this style an Aussie twist.

Suburb Profile: Hamilton South

27/09/2019 Posted by admin

CHARM: This classic Hamilton South home in Kemp Street is set for auction on Saturday with a guide of $1.15 million to $1.25 million.SUBURB SNAPSHOTOnce part of the Australian Agricultural Company’s coal bearing land, this suburb has not looked back since mining stopped in the early 1900s and planning began to make it “a prestigious estate”.
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Well-known for itsCalifornianBungalows on big, leafy blocks and wide, tree-lined streets,Hamilton South’s popularity as a family suburb has been reflected in its continued market growth.

Median house prices are around the $1 million mark and anew suburb sale record of $2.625 million was set last year for an elegant period residence in Alexander Street.

A large portion of the suburb is classified as a garden suburb precinct and is heritage protected.

LIFESTYLEIt is within five minutes of Newcastle’s CBD, Beaumont Streetand Darby Street eateries, parksand beaches.

It is also close toMarketown Shopping Centre andThe Junction andwell-regarded Hamilton South Public School.

ASK THE EXPERT-Presented by First National Newcastle City’s George Rafty

Having grown up and still residing in Hamilton South, I can say first-hand how great the lifestyle is for all family memberswith so many conveniences of a true inner city suburb.

The real estate market in Hamilton South has had a great first half of 2018. Street and suburb records are consistently updatingdue to high demand for quality properties in the area. This demand is driven by the suburb’s proximity to quality schooling, shopping centres, and being only a short drive to the beaches and Newcastle CBD.

Buyers are keen to live in the conservation areaas many period houses have been renovated or improved to further beautify the area. Minimal multi-level or multiple unit complexes have been approved.

58% want Putin to serve past 2024: poll

27/09/2019 Posted by admin

More than half of Russians want Vladimir Putin to stay after his term runs out in 2024, a poll showsMore than half of Russians want President Vladimir Putin to continue serving in the post after his current six-year term finishes in 2024, the country’s largest independent pollster revealed.
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Putin was inaugurated to his fourth term as president this year. The constitution would have to be amended for him to keep the helm in 2024 because it would be the end of a second-consecutive term. Putin would be 71.

“There are no successors. People are viewing this pragmatically,” the pollster’s director, Lev Gudkov, said in comments carried by the Vedomosti newspaper.

The spectre of political change evokes a fear of instability, he said, and Putin is seen as “preserving the status quo.”

Fifty-one per cent of respondents to the nationwide poll, conducted last month, said they would prefer Putin to remain president, while only 27 per cent said they would prefer otherwise.

More than half of respondents have wanted Putin to remain president since 2014, when the indicator jumped from 33 per cent the previous year to 58 per cent, pollster Levada Centre said in a statement on its website.

Russia in 2014 annexed neighbouring Ukraine’s Crimea region and then supported a pro-Russian rebellion in Ukraine’s east, in response to Ukraine ousting its pro-Russian president.

Western powers have widely condemned Russia for those actions, and relations with Ukraine have plummeted to an all-time low. Patriotism surged in the face-off with the West.

“The effect of the Crimea mobilisation is ending,” Gudkov said, “but that was slowed down by the presidential campaign and a new inflation of support.”

Australian Associated Press

A ‘baby bundle’ from the government or maybe something a little more practical?

27/09/2019 Posted by admin

Over the weekend, the NSW government announced it would give the parents of every new child born in NSW a loot bag worth $150, at a cost of $13.5 million each year.
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The “baby bundles”, modelled on thebaby boxes given to new parents in Finland, will contain items such as breast pads, nappy rash cream, a few nappies and a change mat.

As someone who had a baby 10 weeks ago, here are just a few things I’d rather have than a few nappies, books and a sleeping bag.

Now, I love a showbag as much as the next guy, and parents getting their own instead of having to steal a chocolate or two from their kids’ Bertie Beetle bag while they’re not looking is a nice change.

Nappies, books and a sleeping bag? Well, ummm, no thanks. Photo: Shutterstock

But if the government really wants to give NSW women a push present, maybe they should think about what parents really need in those first few months of parenthood.

As someone who had a baby 10 weeks ago, here are just a few things I’d rather have than a few nappies, books and a sleeping bag.

I’d love enough funding for early childhood health centres so they can run groups for any parent with a new baby, not just first-time parents. We are just as isolated and bloody clueless as we were the first time, but I can no longer count on the support of people going through the same thing every Tuesday at 11am.

I’d love a counselling session for every new parent – mums and dads– in the first three months following birth. Postnatal depression and anxiety (PNDA) affects more than one in seven mums and about one in 10 dads.

A convenient session at your local early childhood health centre, without the fuss of a GP referral, would be an awesome early intervention for those of us who may experience PNDA.

And, let’s face it, there’s not a parent on the planet who wouldn’t benefit from a counselling session: when you’re sleep deprived and waist-deep in nappies, breastmilk and bottles, in addition to trying desperately to get your baby to read the baby book so she realises she’s supposed to feed, then play, then sleep (for more than 15 minutes at a time), you’re not okay.

Or how about a couple of hours with a mothercraft nurse? One who comes to your home and shows you strategies for feeding, settling and sleeping. They’re worth their weight in gold (I was ready to propose to the one I saw).

Or a couple of physio sessions for mum so she can get her pelvic floor back to a state where she won’t wee herself every time she laughs too hard or jumps on the trampoline with the kids?

Or vouchers for occasional care or babysitters so mum and dad might actually be able to leave their little cherub for a few hours and remember they’re people as well as parents?

These are just a few things I can think of while juggling a rambunctious two-year-old and a 10-week-old, after not sleeping more than a few hours at a time for months. With a full night’s sleep and a parliamentary salary, just imagine all the things you could think of to give new parents that would be a lot more useful than some flipping breast pads and hand sanitiser.

But, if your goal is to spend $150 on giving new parents something they don’t need, then make it a bottle of Veuve Clicquot Vintage, please. At least that way we can enjoy it.

The Age

Property Watch: “Magestic” Merewether home at 8 Kempster Road has hit the market

27/09/2019 Posted by admin

Merewether’s ‘Takamuna’ hits the market with $3.2 million guide A LOVED HOME: Takamuna is positioned on nearly 2000 square metres of land in Merewether and has been enjoyed by four generations of the Todhunter family.
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8 Kempster Road, Merewether has hit the market

8 Kempster Road, Merewether has hit the market

8 Kempster Road, Merewether has hit the market

8 Kempster Road, Merewether has hit the market

8 Kempster Road, Merewether has hit the market

8 Kempster Road, Merewether has hit the market

8 Kempster Road, Merewether has hit the market

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“We had seven huge21stbirthdays and three massive weddings there as well.

“As kidsitwas an ideal playground for us, and the neighbourhood.

“There were huge Sunday barbecues on the verandah for family and friends followed by tennis and then cricket on the court into the evening.”

The “amazingly private” home and its sprawling surroundshavealso been enjoyed by25 grandchildren and threegreat grandchildren.

Features of Takamuna include formal lounge and dining rooms, ornate ceilings, french doors, fireplaces and leadlight windows.There is a tennis court, pool andfreestanding triple garage.

PRDnationwide’s Mark Kentwell is marketing the property.

Read more: Homes of the Hunter | Newcastle East

Lenaghan House receives offersIt was damaged by fire in May but that has not stopped offers coming in for historic Lenaghan House near Minmi.

Believed to have been built in the late 1800s and first known as The Old Lenaghan Hotel, Lenaghan House sits on27.543hectares andis zoned ‘Environmental Conservation’. It is being marketedby Castle Property’s Adriano Rossi throughexpressions of interest.

“We asked where people saw value andhad market feedback between $600,000 and $800,000,” Mr Rossi said.

“We’re now negotiating with the top couple of parties.”

RESTORATION PROJECT: Historic Lenaghan House on Lenaghan Drive near Minmi has received market feedback between $600,000 and $800,000.

Read more: Lambton Park hotel sold

Water’s Edge gains approvalThe $80 millionresidential developmentWater’s Edge at Warners Bay has been granted development approval by Lake Macquarie City Council.

Work is expected to commence on the site, positioned on the corner of the Esplanade and King Street, in coming weeks.

The BLOC development willcomprise 112 apartments andPRDnationwide’s Mark Kentwell reported good sales since its release in September.

“More than 70 per cent of the apartments have now sold off the plan and we are now selling the remainder and inviting expressions of interest for the ground floor commercial spaces,” Mr Kentwell said.

An artist’s impression of an apartment in Water’s Edge.

Rare find in AdamstownA three-bedroom cottagein Adamstown has beenlisted with a price expectedto appeal to first home buyers, investors and downsizers.

According to Australian Property Monitors data, the median sale price in the suburb rose from $575,000 in 2016 to $713,000 last year.

This three-bedroom cottage at 97 Gosford Road is set for auction on July 7 with a guide $560,000.

Tammy Hawkins, of McGrath Estate Agents, will take97 Gosford Road to auction on July 7 with a guide$560,000.

”It’s sitting in a great capital growth zone and there aren’t many decent properties you can buy at that price point,” Ms Hawkins said.

Read more: New price highs for Waratah and Lambton

On the market under $500KA renovated three-bedroom home at 32 Robert Street in Jesmondis being marketed by Your Agency’s Kristy Bandy with a price guide of $480,000 to $500,000.

Read more: New GWH Build project Sky Residences released to market

Adelaide Archbishop Philip Wilson faces sentence hearing for failing to report child sexual abuse for police

27/09/2019 Posted by admin

‘Time to send a message’: magistrate urged to jail Adelaide Archbishop GUILTY: Adelaide Archbishop Philip Wilson outside Newcastle courthouse ahead of his sentence hearing for failing to report child sexual abuse to police. Magistrate Stone will sentence Wilson on July 3. Picture: Darren Pateman
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GUILTY: Adelaide Archbishop Philip Wilson outside Newcastle courthouse ahead of his sentence hearing for failing to report child sexual abuse to police. Magistrate Stone will sentence Wilson on July 3. Picture: Darren Pateman

GUILTY: Adelaide Archbishop Philip Wilson outside Newcastle courthouse ahead of his sentence hearing for failing to report child sexual abuse to police. Magistrate Stone will sentence Wilson on July 3. Picture: Darren Pateman

GUILTY: Adelaide Archbishop Philip Wilson outside Newcastle courthouse ahead of his sentence hearing for failing to report child sexual abuse to police. Magistrate Stone will sentence Wilson on July 3. Picture: Darren Pateman

GUILTY: Adelaide Archbishop Philip Wilson outside Newcastle courthouse ahead of his sentence hearing for failing to report child sexual abuse to police. Magistrate Stone will sentence Wilson on July 3. Picture: Darren Pateman

GUILTY: Adelaide Archbishop Philip Wilson outside Newcastle courthouse ahead of his sentence hearing for failing to report child sexual abuse to police. Magistrate Stone will sentence Wilson on July 3. Picture: Darren Pateman

GUILTY: Adelaide Archbishop Philip Wilson outside Newcastle courthouse ahead of his sentence hearing for failing to report child sexual abuse to police. Magistrate Stone will sentence Wilson on July 3. Picture: Darren Pateman

GUILTY: Adelaide Archbishop Philip Wilson outside Newcastle courthouse ahead of his sentence hearing for failing to report child sexual abuse to police. Magistrate Stone will sentence Wilson on July 3. Picture: Darren Pateman

GUILTY: Adelaide Archbishop Philip Wilson outside Newcastle courthouse ahead of his sentence hearing for failing to report child sexual abuse to police. Magistrate Stone will sentence Wilson on July 3. Picture: Darren Pateman

TweetFacebook GUILTY: Adelaide Archbishop Philip Wilson outside Newcastle courthouse ahead of his sentence hearing for failing to report child sexual abuse to police. Magistrate Stone will sentence Wilson on July 3. Picture: Darren Pateman THE only way to send a clear message to powerful religious organisations about institutional concealment of child sexual abuse is to send Adelaide Archbishop Philip Edward Wilson to jail.

That was the powerful parting message that Crown prosecutor Gareth Harrison had for Magistrate Robert Stone on Tuesday asArchbishop Wilson, the most senior Catholic cleric in the world to be found guilty of failing to report child sexual abuse to police, faced a sentence hearing in Newcastle Local Court.

“We’ve gotten to a stage where the courts and the community will no longer accept or tolerate the endemic cover-up of sexual abuse by adults on the most vulnerable members of the community,” Mr Harrison said.

Mr Harrison said the need to punish Archbishop Wilson,denounce his conduct, deter others from similar offending and recognise the harm done to the victims loomed large in what was a case so high profile last month’s landmark verdict was heard around the world.

But Mr Stone is being asked to weigh the prosecution’s submissions against the subjective material provided by defence barrister, Ian Temby, QC, who said Archbishop Wilson’s medical and mental health conditions and the likelihood of him being, incorrectly, viewed as a sex offender in custody and assaulted would make his time in jail more onerous.

He referred to a number of medical expert reports, which opined that his mental health would deteriorate and he could be targeted.

“These considerations would impact substantially on the Archbishop’s health and well-being and may even threatenhis survival,” Mr Temby said when referring to one expert’s report.

Mr Temby also produced a raft of character references,which he said showed Archbishop Wilson was a “true leader of the church” and a trailblazer in terms of introducing police checks and compliance systems.

“We’ll be developing a case that he isnot just a man who has no prior convictions,” Mr Temby said.

“But he is in fact a man of prior positive good character, with particular reference to the general field of prevention of child sexual abuse and the protection of children.”

Mr Temby’s ultimate submission was that Archbishop Wilson should be convicted of the offence, but given a good behaviour bond and spared a jail term.

After hearing from both sides, Mr Stone said he was unable to come to a decision on Tuesday and adjourned the matter until July 3 for sentence.

Archbishop Wilson faces the maximum of two years in jail for the charge of concealing a serious indictable offence of another person.

Maroon Ponga has no regrets over NZ snub

27/09/2019 Posted by admin

Kiwi-born Kalyn Ponga looks to have made the right call in pledging his allegiance to Queensland.He still considers himself an All Blacks fan.
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But Kalyn Ponga has no regrets about snubbing his father’s homeland and pledging his allegiance to Queensland.

The 20-year-old appeared to have made the right call after joining the Maroons camp on the Gold Coast ahead of his much-anticipated State of Origin debut in Sunday’s must-win game two.

Queensland may have won a tug of war for Ponga’s allegiances but the young gun’s New Zealand ties still came up when he fronted a packed media scrum at Camp Maroon.

His father Andre is a Kiwi, while Ponga was born in Western Australia but spent five years in New Zealand from the age of eight, enough to become a devout All Blacks fan.

Asked at Camp Maroon if he still backed the All Blacks, Ponga said: “I do, yes. I hope they do well.”

But Ponga said the decision to put his hand up for Queensland sat well with him – and his New Zealand-born dad.

“I was comfortable when I made the decision. My family means a lot to me and getting their acceptance was very important,” he said.

“Once I got that I was very happy with my decision.

“But making the decision wasn’t going to get me anywhere. I have done a lot of hard work to get here.”

Ponga had no complaints after earning a Maroons cap with just 24 NRL games to his name.

But not so long ago it seemed Ponga was torn over his representative future.

Ponga avoided making a representative call altogether in 2016 when he opted not to play rep footy after being eligible for both the Junior Kiwis and Junior Kangaroos.

In October, he was picked for the Maori side to take on New Zealand Residents in Auckland, only to be reduced to running the drinks because of a shoulder complaint.

Ponga has been earmarked for greatness since 2016, when he became just the sixth player to make his NRL debut in the finals at just 17.

He had played just two NRL games for North Queensland when he signed a four-year, $3 million-plus Newcastle deal from 2018.

Asked if he was feeling the pressure ahead of his Origin debut, the laid-back Ponga said: “I always get that question but I never really do.

“The things that go through my mind are doing my role for the boys, make my family proud, outside of that … I don’t feel any expectations, no.”

Australian Associated Press

Phipps won’t overplay against the Irish

27/09/2019 Posted by admin

Nick Phipps says there’s enough talent in the Wallabies to ensure he doesn’t overplay his hand.There’s only one Will Genia and Nick Phipps has no plans trying to mimic the Wallabies’ master No.9 when he fills in at halfback in Saturday night’s series-deciding Test against Ireland.
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A vastly different package to the injured Genia, Phipps will rely on his supreme fitness and slick scrum-base service when he steps up for his first Test start since bagging a try in Australia’s 63-30 win over Japan last November in Yokohama.

“It’s going to be an unreal experience. When you get your opportunities, you look forward to having a go,” Phipps told AAP.

“I’ve really enjoyed the role I’ve had the last few years, last few Tests, to bring that energy off the bench and now I get a chance to play some good footy starting off and setting a platform for the rest of the squad to come through.”

The 29-year-old won’t be over-playing his hand in what will be just his 29th start in 64 Tests since debuting at the 2011 World Cup in New Zealand.

“I guess on the weekend I can just slot into my role,” Phipps said.

“I don’t really have to do too much. I just want to make sure that I’m getting in there, giving good service, having great communication with the ‘piggies’ (forwards) and being able to drive the squad on.

“It’s not about having to go in there and do too much. The talent that’s around the team, they’ll be able to make something happen.”

In what could prove decisive for the Wallabies, Phipps will reunite with a swag of NSW Waratahs teammates on their Super Rugby home ground at Allianz Stadium.

He’s looking forward to the familiar surroundings and, in particular, combining with backline aces Bernard Foley, Kurtley Beale and Israel Folau, not to mention Waratahs and Wallabies captain Michael Hooper.

“It is good to be back home at Allianz. We know the Sydney crowd’s going to be awesome. It was sold out months ago,” said Phipps.

“I’m sure the Irish will just roll down the hill from Coogee and it’s also good to have a great bunch of blokes directly around you that you play a lot of footy with.”

Australian Associated Press

Mooy wants ‘better job’ from Socceroos

27/09/2019 Posted by admin

Aaron Mooy wants more of the same from the Socceroos – just a little better.Socceroos midfielder Aaron Mooy says there’s no tactical shift to come from Australia as they shift their World Cup attention from France to Denmark.
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The Socceroos confront the Scandinavians in Samara on Thursday with their Russian ambitions on the line after a first-up loss to the French.

Mooy says a win is required if Australia are to take realistic ambitions of reaching the round of 16.

But that doesn’t mean it’s all-out attack against Denmark.

“We have a game plan and we’ve always played that since the coaching staff have come in,” Mooy said on Tuesday.

“Not a lot is changing. We’ll just try and do our jobs better.”

Mooy is key to how the Socceroos attack under Bert van Marwijk.

The Dutchman has set Australia up with a defence-first mindset, preparing them first and foremost to be compact without the ball to restrict opposition teams.

When the Socceroos win back the ball, it’s Mooy more than all others who is used to launch counter-attacks.

The Huddersfield Town man is sought out by the defence to receive the ball, and when he gets it, the wingers and striker are often seen getting on their heels ready to receive his passes.

While the prevailing view both inside and outside the Socceroos camp is that Australia’s performance against France was strong, there’s no doubting the need for an improved output in attack.

Australia’s goal in Kazan came from the penalty spot after Samuel Umtiti’s bizarre decision to handball in the box.

Otherwise, the Socceroos were restricted to a clutch of half-chances.

In Samara, Mooy conceded that needs to change.

“Against France, the game plan worked well,” he said.

“Maybe we need to attack a little bit more but it just depends on the way the game’s going … hopefully we can create chances and put them away.”

Mooy said he understood the stakes in the second group game.

A loss would give Australia just a mathematical chance of progression, and a draw would see the Socceroos hoping that other results go their way to progress.

“We need to win,” he said.

“Every game in the World Cup now is like a final.”

Australian Associated Press